Updates

Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA) Medical Standards for Drivers Guide Replaces 2010 BC Guide

Effective April 1, 2016 the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA) Medical Standards for Drivers Guide has replaced the 2010 BC Guide in Determining Fitness to Drive. Occupational therapists that refer to the 2010 BC Guide to support their practice are advised to review the new Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA) Medical Standards for Drivers Guide to understand how this change may affect their practice.

PLEASE NOTE: The amendments to Section 230 of the BC Motor Vehicle Act which would require occupational therapists to report concerns of a person’s fitness to drive are still not in force.

Why the change?
In December 2015, following consultation with a variety of stakeholders, RoadSafetyBC decided to replace the 2010 BC Guide in Determining Fitness to Drive with the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA) Medical Standards for Drivers.

CCMTA standards were adopted because they are:

  • More current and used the strong foundation of the 2010 BC Guide;
  • Regularly reviewed by licensing authorities, clinicians and researchers from across Canada to ensure currency and reflection of existing medical opinion and advances in research and knowledge;
  • Easier to use as a reference for clinicians and a tool for licensing bodies;
  • A balance of national consistency and local jurisdiction’s determined practices;
  • Currently used across Canada with the exception of BC.

How does this influence occupational therapy practice?

COTBC and CAOT-BC partnered to consult with a group of occupational therapists who regularly refer to the 2010 BC Guide in their practice. The purpose of the consultation was to determine the significance of this change for occupational therapy practice. After considering the differences outlined in the RoadSafetyBC overview report, these occupational therapists indicated that the changes are likely to have minimal impact. However, it is important that occupational therapists still review the new standards, understand any differences, and apply them in their practice after April 1, 2016.

Want to learn more?

Visit the RoadSafetyBC website to review the Guide, FAQs, and other resources.

For specific practice questions regarding the new CCMTA Standards, please contact RoadSafetyBC or 1 (855) 387-7747.


Occupational Therapists Will Have Duty and Authority to Report Driver Fitness Concerns (updated March 11, 2016)

On June 3, 2010, Bill 14 Motor Vehicle Amendment Act became law, providing for several amendments to the BC Motor Vehicle Act. The relevant section for registrants is the amendment to Section 230, Report of medical condition or impairment. Occupational therapists and nurse practitioners are now part of the current healthcare professionals’ list of psychologists, optometrists and medical practitioners who have a duty and authority to report under the Act about concerns of a person’s fitness to drive as a result of a medical condition or functional impairment. The amendment will also specify the medical conditions and impairments that affect someone’s ability to drive, and must be reported to the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles.

Registrants should be aware that the amendments to Section 230 are still not in force as the regulations, developed by the B.C. Office of the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles (OSMV) are not yet finalized by the Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General. The OSMV has confirmed the approval of the regulations is delayed indefinitely. OSMV reassured the College that once the regulations are approved, there is a planned transition period of six months for bringing them into force. A news alert will be issued once the regulations are developed and the amendments are to be followed by occupational therapists.